Rupert Carington, 7th Baron Carrington

English businessman and member of the House of Lords (born 1948)

The Lord Carrington
Official portrait of Lord Carrington crop 2.jpg
Carrington in 2019
Lord Great Chamberlain
Assumed office
8 September 2022
MonarchCharles III
Preceded byThe 7th Marquess of Cholmondeley
Member of the House of Lords
Hereditary peerage
28 November 2018 – 8 September 2022
Preceded byThe 5th Baron Northbourne
Succeeded byVacant
Ex officio as Lord Great Chamberlain
8 September 2022
Preceded byThe 7th Marquess of Cholmondeley
Personal details
Born
Rupert Francis John Carington

(1948-12-02) 2 December 1948 (age 73)
Political partyNone (crossbench)
Spouse
Daniela Diotallevi
(m. 1989)
Children3
Parents
EducationEton College
Alma materUniversity of Bristol

Rupert Francis John Carington, 7th Baron Carrington, DL (born 2 December 1948), is a British businessman and crossbench member of the House of Lords.

Since the accession of Charles III in September 2022, he has served as Lord Great Chamberlain of England.

Early life

Carrington was the third child and only son of Peter Carington, 6th Baron Carrington (1919–2018), and his wife Iona née McClean (1920–2009).[1] At the time of his birth, his father was in the beginning of his political career and would later hold several prominent positions, including those of Defence Secretary and Foreign Secretary in the first Thatcher ministry. He went on to become the sixth Secretary General of NATO.

Carrington has two sisters, Alexandra (born 1943), married to Captain Peter de Bunsen, and Virginia (born 1946), married to Henry Cubitt, 4th Baron Ashcombe (divorced).[2] His maternal grandfather was civil engineer and aviator Francis McClean.[3] His ancestor Thomas Smith was the founder of Smith's Bank.[4]

He was educated at Eton College and graduated from Bristol University with a Bachelor of Science degree.[5]

Career

Carrington worked at the merchant bank Morgan, Grenfell & Co. for seventeen years[6] before starting his own financial advisory business, Rupert Carington Limited, in 1987.[7][8] He currently serves as Chairman of Vietnam Infrastructure Ltd. and of Schroder AsiaPacific Fund,[9] and as an international adviser at the LGT Group.[6]

He succeeded his father as Baron Carrington in July 2018[5][10] and became a member of the House of Lords in November of that year, after winning a Crossbench hereditary peers' by-election, following the retirement of Lord Northbourne.[11]

On the accession of Charles III in 2022, Carrington became Lord Great Chamberlain of England,[12] due to the rotation of the office between three families.[13]

Personal life

Carrington married Daniela Diotallevi (born 1959) on 12 September 1989. They have three children:[14][10]

  • Hon. Robert Carington (born 7 December 1990, heir apparent)
  • Hon. Francesca Aurora Carington (born 24 July 1993)
  • Hon. Isabella Iona Carington (born 19 May 1995)

Honours

Carrington was appointed a deputy lieutenant of Buckinghamshire in November 1999.[15]

References

  1. ^ Langdon, Julia (10 July 2018). "Lord Carrington obituary". The Guardian. Retrieved 6 September 2018.
  2. ^ "Lord Ashcombe - obituary". The Telegraph. 25 December 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2018.
  3. ^ Hon. Rupert Francis John Carrington, gen.cookancestry.com.
  4. ^ J. Leighton Boyce, Smith's the Bankers 1658–1958 (1958).
  5. ^ a b Burke's Peerage, volume 1 (2003), p. 706
  6. ^ a b Rupert Francis John Carington, bloomberg.com.
  7. ^ Rupert Carington Limited, beta.companieshouse.gov.uk.
  8. ^ Rupert Carington Limited, beta.companieshouse.gov.uk.
  9. ^ Rupert Francis John Carington, www.4-traders.com.
  10. ^ a b "Rupert Francis John Carington, 7th Baron Carrington of Upton". thepeerage.com. Retrieved 8 October 2018.
  11. ^ "Crossbench hereditary peers' by-election, November 2018: result" (PDF). House of Lords. 28 November 2018.
  12. ^ Dora Davies-Evitt, The Marquess of Cholmondeley replaced by Lord Carrington as Lord Great Chamberlain, Tatler, 13 September 2022.
  13. ^ "Position of the Lord Great Chamberlain following the demise of the monarch (Freedom of Information request)" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 24 September 2021. Retrieved 24 September 2021.
  14. ^ Carington, Rupert Francis John, Webb-site Who's Who.
  15. ^ "No. 55667". The London Gazette. 15 November 1999. p. 12117.
Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by Baron Carrington
2nd creation
2018–present
Incumbent
Heir apparent:
Hon. Robert Carington
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by Baron Carrington
3rd creation
2018–present
Incumbent
Heir apparent:
Hon. Robert Carington
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by Elected hereditary peer to the House of Lords
under the House of Lords Act 1999
2018–2022
Vacant
Order of precedence in England and Wales
Preceded by
Ambassadors and High commissioners
to the United Kingdom
Gentlemen
Lord Great Chamberlain
Succeeded byas Earl Marshal
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Preceded by
Ambassadors and High commissioners
to the United Kingdom
Gentlemen
Lord Great Chamberlain
Succeeded byas Earl Marshal
Court offices
Preceded by Lord Great Chamberlain
2022–present
Incumbent
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